Home » The Coal Question: An Inquiry Concerning the Progress of the Nation, and the Probable Exhaustion of Our Coal Mines (1866) by William Stanley Jevons
The Coal Question: An Inquiry Concerning the Progress of the Nation, and the Probable Exhaustion of Our Coal Mines (1866) William Stanley Jevons

The Coal Question: An Inquiry Concerning the Progress of the Nation, and the Probable Exhaustion of Our Coal Mines (1866)

William Stanley Jevons

Published
ISBN : 9781120860422
Hardcover
416 pages
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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. OPINIONS OF PREVIOUS WRITERS. One of the earliestMorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. OPINIONS OF PREVIOUS WRITERS. One of the earliest writers who conceived it was possible to exhaust our coal mines was John Williams, a mineral surveyor. In his Natural History of the Mineral Kingdom, first published in 1789, he gave a chapter to the consideration of The Limited Quantity of Coal of Britain. His remarks are highly intelligent, and prove him to be one of the first to appreciate the value of coal, and to foresee the consequences which must some time result from its failure. This event he rather prematurely apprehended- but in those days, when no statistics had been collected, and a geological map was un thought of, accurate notions were not to be expected. Still, his views on this subject may be read with profit, even at the present day. Sir John Sinclair, in his great Statistical Account of Scotland,1 took a most enlightened viewof the importance of coal- and, in noticing the Fifeshire coal-field, expressed considerable fears as to a future exhaustion of our mines. He correctly contrasted the fixed extent of a coalfield with the ever-growing nature of the consumption of coal. 1 Vol. xii. p. 547. In 1812 Robert Bald, another Scotch writer, in his very intelligent General View of the Coal Trade of Scotland, showed most clearly how surely and rapidly a consumption, growing in a quick, increasing series,1 must overcome a fixed store, however large. Even if the Grampian mountains, he said,2 were composed of coal, we would ultimately bring down their summits, and make them level with the vales. In later years, the esteemed geologist, Dr. Buckland, most prominently and earnestly brought this subject before the public, both in his evidence before the Parliamentary Committees of 1830 and 1835, and in his celebrated Bridgewater Treatis...